Find Two Added Integers

December 16, 2014

I saw this question at a popular interview-question site and got mad at the suggested answer:

You are given two lists containing identical sets of integers except that the first list contains two additional integers not present in the second set. For instance, with a = {1 4 9 2 7 3} and b = {9 7 4 1}, the two additional integers are 2 and 3. Write a program to find the two additional integers.

Your task is to write the requested program. When you are finished, you are welcome to read or run a suggested solution, or to post your own solution or discuss the exercise in the comments below.

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Magic Squares

December 12, 2014

Magic squares are an arrangement of consecutive counting numbers starting from 1 into rows and columns in which every row, column and the two main diagonals all sum to the same number. Magic squares are an important element of recreational mathematics, and have been known since antiquity; this magic square of order 3, with magic sum 15, was published in China in 650BC:

4 9 2
3 5 7
8 1 6

That magic square was constructed by the “start bottom, move down and right, else up” rule: Starting from either of the center cells on the bottom row, enter a 1, then move to the next square diagonally down and right (wrapping around the sides of the square if necessary), then enter the next number in sequence, 2, and so on. However, if the next square is occupied, move instead to the next square up from the current square, then continue the sequence. Various rules like “start left, move down and right, else up” and “start top, move up and right, else down” also work, but rules like “start top, move down and left, else up” don’t; I’ll let you have the pleasure of figuring out which rules work and which don’t. This method works only for odd orders; there are other methods for even orders, which we may examine at some other time.

In the example square, the starting cell is the center cell on the bottom edge, where you see 1. Moving down and right and wrapping to the top of the next column, enter 2. Then moving down and right and wrapping to the left of the next row, enter 3. The next cell down and right already contains 1, so instead move up from the current cell and enter 4. Then moving down and right, enter 5. Then moving down and right, enter 6. The next cell down and right, wrapping both the row and column, already contains 4, so instead move up from the current cell and enter 7. Then moving down and right and wrapping to the left of the next row, enter 8. Finally, moving down and right and wrapping to the top of the next column, enter 9.

Your task is to write a program that takes an odd order n, one of the four starting cells and a rule and generates the indicated magic square. When you are finished, you are welcome to read or run a suggested solution, or to post your own solution or discuss the exercise in the comments below.

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Every Possible Fraction

December 9, 2014

When I saw this web page a few days ago, I knew it would make a great exercise, simple but fascinating. Starting with x = 1, every fraction in lowest terms is generated by x ′ = 1 / (ny + 1), where n = ⌊ x ⌋ and y = x − n. The underlying math is known as the Stern-Brocot tree, and has been known since the ancient Greeks, who used terms of the Stern-Brocot tree to design the gear ratios in the Antikythera mechanism.

Your task is to write a program that generates the fractions in lowest terms. When you are finished, you are welcome to read or run a suggested solution, or to post your own solution or discuss the exercise in the comments below.

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Free Time

December 5, 2014

We have a very practical task today: Given the set of busy-time intervals of two people, as in a calendar, find the free-time intervals of both people so they can arrange a meeting.

Your task is to write a program to find free time. When you are finished, you are welcome to read or run a suggested solution, or to post your own solution or discuss the exercise in the
comments below.

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Gray Code Neighbors

December 2, 2014

Our exercise today is based on Gray code sequences, where each number in the sequence differs from its predecessor in only one bit. We studied Gray code sequences in a previous exercise. Here is an interview question base on Gray code sequences:

Given two integers, determine if they are two consecutive numbers in a Gray code sequence.

Your task is to write a program that determines if two numbers appear consecutively in a Gray code sequence. When you are finished, you are welcome to read or run a suggested solution, or to post your own solution or discuss the exercise in the comments below.

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A Prime Number Puzzle

November 28, 2014

Today’s exercise comes from the world of recreational mathematics.

For each number n from 1 to 9 inclusive, find a number m that begins with the digit n, has n digits, has each two-digit sequence within m a different prime number, and is as small as possible.

When you are finished, you are welcome to read or run a suggested solution, or to post your own solution or discuss the exercise in the comments below.

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In 1968, Newsweek published an article “How to Win at Wordsmanship” by Philip Broughton. You pick a random number from 000 to 999, then look up a three word phrase in a table coded by the three digits of the random number:

Column 1 Column 2 Column 3
0. integrated 0. management 0. options
1. total 1. organizational 1. flexibility
2. systematized 2. monitored 2. capability
3. parallel 3. reciprocal 3. mobility
4. functional 4. digital 4. programming
5. responsive 5. logistical 5. concept
6. optional 6. transitional 6. time-phase
7. synchronized 7. incremental 7. projection
8. compatible 8. third-generation 8. hardware
9. balanced 9. policy 9. contingency

For instance, the random number 031 leads to the phrase “integrated reciprocal flexibility,” which you can use in a technical conversation or report. Broughton said “No one will have the remotest idea of what you are talking about, but the important thing is that they’re not about to admit it.”

Since then, many buzz-phrase generators have been developed, including corporate-speak “holistically embrace customer-directed imperatives” and the Shakespearean insult generator that gave us the title of our exercise. We have a couple of word lists on the next page, or you can Google for “buzz-phrase generator” to find lots of them on the web, but it’s most fun to build your own.

Your task is to write a program that generates random buzz-phrases. When you are finished, you are welcome to read or run a suggested solution, or to post your own solution or discuss the exercise in the comments below.

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An Array Of Zeroes

November 21, 2014

Beware! Today’s exercise, which derives from an interview question asked at Facebook, is trickier than it looks:

You are given an array of integers. Write a program that moves all non-zero integers to the left end of the array, and all zeroes to the right end of the array. Your program should operate in place. The order of the non-zero integers doesn’t matter. As an example, given the input array [1,0,2,0,0,3,4], your program should permute the array to [1,4,2,3,0,0,0] or something similar, and return the value 4.

Your task is to write the indicated program. When you are finished, you are welcome to read or run a suggested solution, or to post your own solution or discuss the exercise in the comments below.

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Damm’s Algorithm

November 18, 2014

We studied Hans Peter Luhn’s algorithm for generating check digits in a previous exercise. Today, we look at an alternate check digit algorithm developed by H. Michael Damm. Both algorithms are useful for creating checked identification numbers, suitable for credit cards or other identity numbers.

Damm’s algorithm is based on table lookup. It is initialized with a current check digit of 0. Then, each digit of the number, from left to right (most-significant to least-significant) is looked up in a two-dimensional table with the current check digit pointing to the row and the digit of the number pointing to the column, using this table:

  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
0 0 3 1 7 5 9 8 6 4 2
1 7 0 9 2 1 5 4 8 6 3
2 4 2 0 6 8 7 1 3 5 9
3 1 7 5 0 9 8 3 4 2 6
4 6 1 2 3 0 4 5 9 7 8
5 3 6 7 4 2 0 9 5 8 1
6 5 8 6 9 7 2 0 1 3 4
7 8 9 4 5 3 6 2 0 1 7
8 9 4 3 8 6 1 7 2 0 9
9 2 5 8 1 4 3 6 7 9 0

For instance, given the input 572, the check digit is 4 and the output is 5724. The check digit is computed starting with 0, then row 0 and column 5 gives a new check digit of 9, row 9 and column 7 gives a new check digit of 7, and row 7 and column 2 gives a final check digit of 4. Notice that leading zeroes do not affect the check digit.

Checking goes the same way, and is successful if the final check digit is 0. Given the input 5724, the initial check digit is 0, then row 0 and column 5 gives a new check digit of 9, row 9 and column 7 gives a new check digit of 7, row 7 and column 2 gives a new check digit of 4, and row 4 and column 4 gives a final check digit of 0.

Your task is to write functions that add a check digit to a number and validate a number to which a check digit has been added. When you are finished, you are welcome to read or run a suggested solution, or to post your own solution or discuss the exercise in the comments below.

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Dawkins’ Weasel

November 14, 2014

In his book The Blind Watchmaker, Richard Dawkins says:

I don’t know who it was first pointed out that, given enough time, a monkey bashing away at random on a typewriter could produce all the works of Shakespeare. The operative phrase is, of course, given enough time. Let us limit the task facing our monkey somewhat. Suppose that he has to produce, not the complete works of Shakespeare but just the short sentence ‘Methinks it is like a weasel’, and we shall make it relatively easy by giving him a typewriter with a restricted keyboard, one with just the 26 (capital) letters, and a space bar. How long will he take to write this one little sentence?

(All of our quotes are shamelessly stolen from Wikipedia.) Then Dawkins suggests that this is a bad analogy for evolution, and proposes this alternative:

We again use our computer monkey, but with a crucial difference in its program. It again begins by choosing a random sequence of 28 letters, just as before … it duplicates it repeatedly, but with a certain chance of random error – ‘mutation’ – in the copying. The computer examines the mutant nonsense phrases, the ‘progeny’ of the original phrase, and chooses the one which, however slightly, most resembles the target phrase, METHINKS IT IS LIKE A WEASEL.

Then he discusses a computer program that simulates his monkey, which he says took half an hour to run because it was written BASIC; when he rewrote his program in Pascal the runtime dropped to eleven seconds. His program used this algorithm:

  1. Start with a random string of 28 characters.
  2. Make 100 copies of the string (reproduce).
  3. For each character in each of the 100 copies, with a probability of 5%, replace (mutate) the character with a new random character.
  4. Compare each new string with the target string “METHINKS IT IS LIKE A WEASEL”, and give each a score (the number of letters in the string that are correct and in the correct position).
  5. If any of the new strings has a perfect score (28), halt. Otherwise, take the highest scoring string, and go to step 2.

Your task is to write a program to simulate Dawkins’ monkey. When you are finished, you are welcome to read or run a suggested solution, or to post your own solution or discuss the exercise in the comments below.

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